Annals of African Medicine

ORIGINAL ARTICLE
Year
: 2016  |  Volume : 15  |  Issue : 1  |  Page : 1--6

Effect of providing feedback and prescribing education on prescription writing: An intervention study


Adetutu A Ajemigbitse1, Moses Kayode Omole2, Wilson O Erhun3 
1 Department of Pharmacy, National Hospital Abuja, Abuja, Nigeria
2 Department of Clinical Pharmacy and Pharmacy Administration, University of Ibadan, Ibadan, Nigeria
3 Department of Clinical Pharmacy and Pharmacy Administration, Obafemi Awolowo University, Ile-Ife, Nigeria

Correspondence Address:
Adetutu A Ajemigbitse
Department of Pharmacy, National Hospital Abuja, Abuja
Nigeria

Background/Objective: Accurate medication prescribing important to avoid errors and ensure best possible outcomes. This is a report of assessment of the impact of providing feedback and educational intervention on prescribing error types and rates in routine practice. Methods: Doctors' prescriptions from selected wards in two tertiary hospitals in central Nigeria were prospectively reviewed for a 6-month period and assessed for errors; grouped into six categories. Intervention was by providing feedback and educational outreach on the specialty/departmental level at one hospital while the other acted as the control. Chi-squared statistics was used to compare prescribing characteristics pre- and post-intervention. Results: At baseline, error rate was higher at the control site. At the intervention site, statistically significant reductions were obtained for errors involving omission of route of administration (P < 0.001), under dose (P = 0.012), dose adjustment in renal impairment (P = 0.019), ambiguous orders (P < 0.001) and drug/drug interaction (P < 0.001) post intervention though there was no change in mean error rate post intervention (P = 0.984). Though House Officers and Registrars wrote most prescriptions, highest reduction in prescribing error rates post intervention was by the registrars (0.93% to 0.29%, P < 0.001). Conclusion: Writing prescriptions that lacked essential details was common. Intervention resulted in modest changes. Routinely providing feedback and continuing prescriber education will likely sustain error reduction.


How to cite this article:
Ajemigbitse AA, Omole MK, Erhun WO. Effect of providing feedback and prescribing education on prescription writing: An intervention study.Ann Afr Med 2016;15:1-6


How to cite this URL:
Ajemigbitse AA, Omole MK, Erhun WO. Effect of providing feedback and prescribing education on prescription writing: An intervention study. Ann Afr Med [serial online] 2016 [cited 2023 Feb 2 ];15:1-6
Available from: https://www.annalsafrmed.org/article.asp?issn=1596-3519;year=2016;volume=15;issue=1;spage=1;epage=6;aulast=Ajemigbitse;type=0