Annals of African Medicine

REVIEW ARTICLE
Year
: 2019  |  Volume : 18  |  Issue : 3  |  Page : 121--126

Inflammation and cancer


Nitin Singh1, Deepak Baby2, Jagadish Prasad Rajguru3, Pankaj B Patil4, Savita S Thakkannavar5, Veena Bhojaraj Pujari6 
1 Department of Pedodontics and Preventive Dentistry, Chandra Dental College and Hospital, Safedabad, Barabanki, Uttar Pradesh, India
2 Department of Conservative and Endodontics, P.S.M Dental College and Research Centre, Akkikavu, Thrissur, Kerala, India
3 Department of Oral Pathology and Microbiology, Hi-Tech Dental College and Hospital, Bhubaneswar, Odisha, India
4 Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, School of Dental Sciences, Krishna Institute of Health Sciences Deemed to be University, Karad, Maharashtra, India
5 Department of Oral Pathology and Microbiology, Tatyasaheb Kore Dental College and Research Centre, New Pargaon, Kolhapur, Maharashtra, India
6 Department of Oral Medicine and Radiology, Tatyasaheb Kore Dental College and Research Centre, New Pargaon, Kolhapur, Maharashtra, India

Correspondence Address:
Dr. Nitin Singh
Chandra Dental College and Hospital, Safedabad, Barabanki, UP
India

Inflammation is often associated with the development and progression of cancer. The cells responsible for cancer-associated inflammation are genetically stable and thus are not subjected to rapid emergence of drug resistance; therefore, the targeting of inflammation represents an attractive strategy both for cancer prevention and for cancer therapy. Tumor-extrinsic inflammation is caused by many factors, including bacterial and viral infections, autoimmune diseases, obesity, tobacco smoking, asbestos exposure, and excessive alcohol consumption, all of which increase cancer risk and stimulate malignant progression. In contrast, cancer-intrinsic or cancer-elicited inflammation can be triggered by cancer-initiating mutations and can contribute to malignant progression through the recruitment and activation of inflammatory cells. Both extrinsic and intrinsic inflammations can result in immunosuppression, thereby providing a preferred background for tumor development. The current review provides a link between inflammation and cancer development.


How to cite this article:
Singh N, Baby D, Rajguru JP, Patil PB, Thakkannavar SS, Pujari VB. Inflammation and cancer.Ann Afr Med 2019;18:121-126


How to cite this URL:
Singh N, Baby D, Rajguru JP, Patil PB, Thakkannavar SS, Pujari VB. Inflammation and cancer. Ann Afr Med [serial online] 2019 [cited 2019 Sep 15 ];18:121-126
Available from: http://www.annalsafrmed.org/article.asp?issn=1596-3519;year=2019;volume=18;issue=3;spage=121;epage=126;aulast=Singh;type=0