Annals of African Medicine

ORIGINAL ARTICLE
Year
: 2017  |  Volume : 16  |  Issue : 4  |  Page : 181--185

Tumor-associated macrophages, angiogenesis, and tumor cell migration in oral squamous cell carcinoma


Samuel E Udeabor1, Akinyele O Adisa2, Anna Orlowska4, Robert A Sader4, Shahram Ghanaati4 
1 Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, College of Dentistry, King Khalid University, Abha, Saudi Arabia; Frankfurt Orofacial Regenerative Lab, Department of Oral, Cranio-Maxillofacial and Facial Plastic Surgery, Medical Center of Goethe University Frankfurt am Main, Germany
2 Frankfurt Orofacial Regenerative Lab, Department of Oral, Cranio-Maxillofacial and Facial Plastic Surgery, Medical Center of Goethe University Frankfurt am Main, Germany; Department of Oral Pathology, College of Medicine, University of Ibadan, Nigeria

Correspondence Address:
Shahram Ghanaati
Frankfurt Orofacial Regenerative Lab, Department of Oral, Cranio-Maxillofacial and Facial Plastic Surgery, Medical Center of Goethe University, Frankfurt am Main
Germany

Objective: To investigate the relationship between tumor-associated macrophages (TAMs), neovascularization, and tumor cell migration in oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) of an African subpopulation. Materials and Methods: Twenty OSCC paraffin blocks underwent immunohistochemistry to TAM1 (CCR7), TAM2 (CD206), Twist, E-cadherin, N-cadherin, and CD34. The relative percentage of CCR7 + and CD206 + cells to overall immune cell population was calculated for three high power fields and an average was taken. TAM-related microvessel density (MVD) was determined as the mean of the three recorded values. Cases that had no CD34 + vessels adjacent to the TAMs region were regarded as having an MVD score of 0. Results: Ten cases (50%) expressed greater CCR7 activity than CD206, seven cases (35%) expressed approximately equal activity of CCR7 and CD206, while three cases (15%) expressed greater activity of CD206 than CCR7. Twist expression was strong in some cases with strong N-cadherin and weak E-cadherin, but the expression of Twist was not consistently high in all cases that expressed strong N-cadherin and weak E-cadherin. Conclusions: TAMs distribution suggested antitumor activity and the potential for tumor metastasis was only partly due to Twist-mediated epithelial–mesenchymal transition.


How to cite this article:
Udeabor SE, Adisa AO, Orlowska A, Sader RA, Ghanaati S. Tumor-associated macrophages, angiogenesis, and tumor cell migration in oral squamous cell carcinoma.Ann Afr Med 2017;16:181-185


How to cite this URL:
Udeabor SE, Adisa AO, Orlowska A, Sader RA, Ghanaati S. Tumor-associated macrophages, angiogenesis, and tumor cell migration in oral squamous cell carcinoma. Ann Afr Med [serial online] 2017 [cited 2020 Feb 24 ];16:181-185
Available from: http://www.annalsafrmed.org/article.asp?issn=1596-3519;year=2017;volume=16;issue=4;spage=181;epage=185;aulast=Udeabor;type=0