Annals of African Medicine

ORIGINAL ARTICLE
Year
: 2013  |  Volume : 12  |  Issue : 4  |  Page : 212--216

Exstrophy anomalies: Preliminary review of 18 cases in Maiduguri, North-eastern Nigeria


JY Chinda1, AM Abubakar1, TM Dabkana2, D Kwari3, Y Mava4, KJ Bwala1, S Wabada1 
1 Department of Surgery, Paediatric Surgical Unit, University of Maiduguri Teaching Hospital, Maiduguri, Borno State, Nigeria
2 Department of Orthopaedic and Traumatology, University of Maiduguri Teaching Hospital, Maiduguri, Borno State, Nigeria
3 Department of Anaesthesia, University of Maiduguri Teaching Hospital, Maiduguri, Borno State, Nigeria
4 Department of Paediatrics, University of Maiduguri Teaching Hospital, Maiduguri, Borno State, Nigeria

Correspondence Address:
J Y Chinda
Deeper Life Bible Church, PMB 516, Maiduguri, Borno State
Nigeria

Background: Exstrophy anomalies, although rare, pose a tremendous challenge to both surgeons and surrogates. Management is intricate and experience with large members is restricted to a few centres worldwide. This report is a review of 18 cases of these anomalies managed in University of Maiduguri Teaching Hospital (UMTH) over 8 years, highlighting the intricacies of management, and contributes to the existing data bank on this subject matter in our environment. Materials and Methods: We reviewed the records of all cases of anomalies that were managed in the index hospital from December 2002 to December 2010. Results: Eighteen cases were studied. The youngest was a 2-day-old neonate and the oldest was 6 years at repair, with a median age of 4 months. There were 7 boys and 9 girls with bladder exstrophy, and the remaining two were girls with cloacal exstrophy, giving a male-female ratio of 7:11 for the exstrophy anomalies. Eight patients (33.5%) had associated congenital anomalies; 16.7% had undescended testes (UDT), anorectal malformation (ARM) and patent processus vaginalis (PPV); and duplicate bladder occurred in 5.6% of the patients. All but one patient had bilateral posterior iliac osteotomy at bladder closure. Out of the 17 patients that had osteotomy, 76.5% had satisfactory bladder closure (no complication), 5.9% had superficial wound dehiscence, 11.8% had bladder neck dehiscence and 5.9% had complete disruption. The lone patient that did not undergo osteotomy had complete bladder dehiscence. Postoperative immobilization was done for 3 weeks for 16 cases; one was discontinued after 1 week because of complication. The longest follow-up was for 2 years and the shortest for 2 weeks. Four patients (22.2%) did not turn up for follow-up. Conclusion: Exstrophy anomalies although rare remain a major challenge in paediatric surgery. Iliac osteotomy, among other technical considerations, remains a cornerstone for successful bladder closure.


How to cite this article:
Chinda J Y, Abubakar A M, Dabkana T M, Kwari D, Mava Y, Bwala K J, Wabada S. Exstrophy anomalies: Preliminary review of 18 cases in Maiduguri, North-eastern Nigeria.Ann Afr Med 2013;12:212-216


How to cite this URL:
Chinda J Y, Abubakar A M, Dabkana T M, Kwari D, Mava Y, Bwala K J, Wabada S. Exstrophy anomalies: Preliminary review of 18 cases in Maiduguri, North-eastern Nigeria. Ann Afr Med [serial online] 2013 [cited 2020 Sep 23 ];12:212-216
Available from: http://www.annalsafrmed.org/article.asp?issn=1596-3519;year=2013;volume=12;issue=4;spage=212;epage=216;aulast=Chinda;type=0