Annals of African Medicine
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ORIGINAL ARTICLE
Year : 2018  |  Volume : 17  |  Issue : 2  |  Page : 75-81

Awareness and attitude to deceased kidney donation among health-care workers in Sokoto, Nigeria


1 Department of Surgery, Usmanu Danfodiyo University, Sokoto, Nigeria
2 Department of Community Health, Usmanu Danfodiyo University, Sokoto, Nigeria
3 Department of Surgery, Usmanu Danfodiyo University Teaching Hospital, Sokoto, Nigeria
4 Department of Internal Medicine, Usmanu Danfodiyo University, Sokoto, Nigeria

Correspondence Address:
Dr. Ngwobia Peter Agwu
Department of Surgery, Usmanu Danfodiyo University, Sokoto
Nigeria
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Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.4103/aam.aam_52_17

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Background: Access to renal replacement therapy by the increasing population of patients with end-stage kidney disease across Sub-Saharan Africa, including Nigeria, has become a major public health challenge. Although deceased kidney donation constitutes a viable source, its uptake by patients is contingent on its acceptance by health-care workers. Objectives: The aim of this study is to assess the awareness and attitude to deceased kidney donation among health-care workers in Sokoto, Nigeria. Materials and Methods: A cross-sectional study was conducted among 470 staff of Usmanu Danfodiyo University Teaching Hospital, Sokoto, Nigeria (attending a 1-week seminar), selected by universal sampling. Data were collected with a set of pretested, self-administered, and semi-structured questionnaire. Results: The mean age of the respondents was 34.1 ± 7.8 years, and most of them (77.7%) were aged <40 years. Majority of respondents were males (60.6%), married (76.5%), and Moslems (73.5%). While almost all the respondents (98.1%) were aware of deceased kidney donation, only about half (51.9%) were willing to accept deceased kidney donation. Furthermore, 43.4% were willing to give consent to donate deceased relative's kidney, and 26.1% were willing to carry an organ donation card. Predictors of willingness to accept deceased kidney donation were male sex, being a medical doctor or laboratory scientist and being a Moslem (Odds ratio >2, P < 0.05). The major disincentives reported were fear that it may not work (42%) and fear of disease transmission (37.0%). Conclusion: Periodic education of health-care workers on effectiveness and safety of deceased kidney donation is crucial to promoting its acceptance among them.


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