Annals of African Medicine
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CASE REPORT
Year : 2017  |  Volume : 16  |  Issue : 4  |  Page : 196-198

A rare case of bleeding disorder: Glanzmann's thrombasthenia


1 Department of Internal Medicine, Stanley Medical College, Chennai, Tamil Nadu, India
2 Department of Orthopaedics, JSS Medical College, Mysore, Karnataka, India

Correspondence Address:
Jami Swathi
1st Floor, House No. 102, Vigyan Lok Society, Karkardooma, New Delhi - 110 092
India
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Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.4103/aam.aam_59_16

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Background: Glanzmann's thrombasthenia (GT) is a rare bleeding disorder, which is characterized by a lack of platelet aggregation. It is characterized by qualitative or quantitative abnormalities of the platelet membrane glycoprotein IIb/IIIa. Physiologically, this platelet receptor normally binds several adhesive plasma proteins, and this facilitates attachment and aggregation of platelets to ensure thrombus formation at sites of vascular injury. The lack of resultant platelet aggregation in GT leads to mucocutaneous bleeding whose manifestation may be clinically variable, ranging from easy bruising to severe and potentially life-threatening hemorrhages. Objective: To highlight this rare but potentially life-threating disorder, GT. Case Report: We report a case of GT that was first detected because of the multiple episodes of gum bleeding. The patient was an 18-year-old girl who presented with a history of repeated episodes of gum bleeding since childhood. Till the first visit to our hospital, she had not been diagnosed with GT despite a history of bleeding tendency, notably purpura in areas of easy bruising, gum bleeding, and prolonged bleeding time after abrasions and insect stings. GT was diagnosed on the basis of prolonged bleeding time, lack of platelet aggregation with adenosine di phosphate, epinephrine and collagen. Conclusion: GT should always be considered as differential diagnosis while evaluating any case of bleeding disorder.


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