Annals of African Medicine
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ORIGINAL ARTICLE
Year : 2010  |  Volume : 9  |  Issue : 3  |  Page : 118-122

Premenstrual dysphoric disorder among medical students of a Nigerian university


1 Department of Behavioural Sciences, College of Health Sciences, University of Ilorin, Nigeria
2 Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, College of Health Sciences, University of Ilorin, Nigeria
3 Department of Pharmacology and Therapeutics, College of Health Sciences, University of Ilorin, Nigeria

Correspondence Address:
Baba A Issa
Department of Behavioural Sciences, College of Health Sciences, University of Ilorin
Nigeria
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Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.4103/1596-3519.68354

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Background/Objective: This study aimed at estimating the prevalence and associated factors of premenstrual dysphoric disorder (PMDD) among medical students in a University in the North-Central State of Nigeria. PMDD is the severest form of premenstrual symptoms and is associated with impairment of social and role functioning. Methods: A cross-sectional study of female medical students of the University of Ilorin College of Health Sciences (n=208), which involves completing a questionnaire to elicit socio-demographic and gynecological information as well as the GHQ-12 questionnaires. They were later interviewed with DSM-IV PMDD instrument. Results: Seventy-five (36.1%) of the respondents met the criteria for the diagnosis of PMDD. Sixty-five (%) of the PMDD cases reported having pain during menses among whom 14 (21.5%) reported mild, 32 (49.2%) moderate and 19 (29.2%) severe form of menstrual pain. Forty-two persons (20.2%) were categorized as having probable psychiatric morbidity using a cut-off of ≥ 3 on GHQ 12. There was neither a causal relationship between psychiatric morbidity (≥ 3 score), and PMDD, nor any association between gynecological factors and PMDD. However, menstrual pain was significantly associated with PMDD (P=0.019). Conclusion: The rate of PMDD in this study is high. Dysmenorrhoea of moderate/severe intensity correlated significantly with the possibility of having PMDD. Efforts should therefore be made to alleviate the pain associated with menses. In addition, the College's health-care providers should take into account the issues of dysmenorrhoea and its management more seriously by intensifying health education on dysmenorrhoea and PMDD in order to improve the quality of life of the students.


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