Annals of African Medicine
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SHORT REPORT
Year : 2009  |  Volume : 8  |  Issue : 4  |  Page : 266-270

Circumcision mishaps in Nigerian children


Department of Surgery, Paediatric Surgery Unit, University of Benin Teaching Hospital, Benin City, Nigeria

Correspondence Address:
O D Osifo
Paediatric Surgery Unit, Department of Surgery, University of Benin Teaching Hospital, Benin City
Nigeria
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Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.4103/1596-3519.59583

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Background/Objective: Circumcision may be associated with complications which are usually minor but could be life threatening on certain occasions. This study determined contributory factors, pattern of presentation, challenges of management and outcome of circumcision mishaps in Benin City, Nigeria. Methods: A retrospective analysis of all male children managed for circumcision mishaps between January 1998 and December 2007 at the University of Benin Teaching Hospital, Benin City, Nigeria. Results: There were 346 male children aged between 6 days and 12 years. Period of presentation to the unit ranged between 1 hour and 12 years. Redundant prepuce, 51 (14.7%); glandulopenile adhesions, 30 (8.7%); implantation cyst, 10 (2.9%); penile chordee, 11 (3.2%); local wound infection, 17 (4.9%); and proximal migration of plastibell ring, 11 (3.2%), were common mishaps treated with good outcome. On the other hand, urethrocutaneous fistula, 73 (21.1%); hemorrhage, 46 (13.3%); glandular amputation, 9 (2.6%); penile tissue avulsion, 24 (7.0%); and transmission of infections, 4 (1.2%), were challenging mishaps to manage. These resulted in 18 children with residual penile deformity and 4 deaths. Challenging mishaps and late referrals were common among children circumcised by traditional circumcisionists ( P < 0.0001). Inadequate training of circumcisionists; circumcision in unhygienic environment; circumcision with unsterilized instruments; circumcision without the use of anesthesia, analgesia and antibiotics - which were compounded by late referrals - influenced the development and final outcome of circumcision mishaps. Conclusion: Circumcision mishaps presenting very late with resultant poor outcome are still common in our setting. Hospital circumcision by experts, health awareness campaigns, adequate training of circumcisionists and early referrals of affected children should be encouraged.


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